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What the Heck does that mean?


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#1 enderwigginau

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 04:24 PM

Here we will list technical terms that newbs may not understand.
If you have something you need explained, post it here and a mod will move it into the dictionary (this post).

Holley - a brand of carburettor produced in America. A very large selection of types and sizes are available, and a number of other brands are based on or re-manufactured versions of these carbys. Holley also produce fuel pumps and fuel regulators.

Stroker
- an engine where the standard stroke has been increase to make the capacity larger. Usually done through offset grinding the crank or by using a larger stroke crank, this generally increases the available torque.

Control Arms (UCA & LCA) - Also called A-arms, due to their shape. Upper control arm holds the top of the stub axle,lower control armholds the bottom of the stub. These pivot about their mounts, tracing an arc where the wheel sits. Off the stub hangs the rotor/brake, on that sits the caliper. The shock usually goes up through the centre.
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Trailing Arms - the rear suspension that attached the differential to the body, and allows for the up and down movement of the differential relative to the vehicle body. Torana's have a Triangulated Fourbar setup to keep the diff (reasonably) centred.
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Sway Bar - A sway bar's function is to resist compression of the outside suspension under cornering loads. It does this by linking to the suspension on the inside of the car. As the outside compresses under cornering load the bar transfers weight to the inside suspension to resist the load... ultimately limiting the roll angle.

Panhard Bar/Rod - A Panhard bar serves the same function as a watts link, but is an inferior design. It limits lateral movement of the diff housing within the wheel housings. So it stops the diff moving sideways like a pendulum under the car.
N.B. The reason a Torana doesn't need a panhard and a Commodore does is that the Torana's upper arms are set an an agle and the Commodores are parallel with the centreline of the vehicle. Please see Traing Arms above.

Carburettors -
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Carburetor Q&A
by Barry Grant Inc. 2004


Attached File  race_demon.jpg   5.59K   1 downloads
Given that a four-barrel carburetor possesses something in the order of 200 components to allow it to function correctly, it's no wonder the average enthusiast has the odd question about how it operates and why. Words and phrases like atomization, vacuum signal, fuel-metering circuits, etc. can be a little bewildering. So, here are a few of the basics with several useful illustrations to help explain. This article contains information that applies to a wide range of V8-engined machines, from street cars to tow vehicles, and from oval track racers to drag strip cars.

1) Q. Is air pushed or sucked into a carburetor?

A. With the exception of forced induction systems (centrifugal supercharger, or turbocharger - where air is forced through the carburetor), air is drawn through the carburetor (sucked) by the engine's vacuum signal. The amount of air is determined by the strength of the vacuum signal.

2) Q. What is the difference between the straight-leg venturi booster, the down-leg booster, and the annular-discharge booster? Also, when should one be used in preference to another, and how does it affect jetting?

A. A straight-leg booster has, as its name implies, a straight leg, which protrudes from the body of the carburetor into the main venturi. Its discharge ring is situated slightly above the venturi's most effective zone. Its discharge ring is slightly above the venturi's most effective zone. The color red indicates the main fuel circuits, which connect with the main jets, the emulsion holes (blue) and the high-speed air bleeds located in the air entry on top of carburetor. The color yellow indicates the idle-fuel circuits, which connect with main-fuel wells, the idle-feed restrictors, the idle-air bleeds (also located in air entry on top of carb), and the idle-discharge ports and transfer slots in the baseplate.
Attached File  straight_leg_booster_500.jpg   22.98K   13 downloads
B. A down-leg or drop-leg venturi booster drops the discharge ring lower in the carburetor's main venturi where it operates in air of higher velocity, which draws more fuel than the straight-leg style of booster.
Attached File  down_leg_boosters_500.jpg   23.78K   8 downloads
C. The annular-discharge venturi booster has a larger ring with multiple discharge holes rather than the single outlet hole of the straight-leg or down-leg style of booster. This has the effect of creating a venturi within the main venturi that produces greater vacuum than either the straight- or down-leg varieties and draws even more fuel.
Attached File  annular_boosters_500.jpg   22.07K   7 downloads
D. In conclusion, the pros and cons of each type of booster are based largely upon its application. However, if each style is tested in the same carburetor with all else being equal, the down-leg booster will require smaller jets to flow the same amount of fuel than a straight-leg booster. And the annular-discharge booster will require even smaller jets to flow the same amount of fuel as the down-leg type.

3) Q. Mechanical secondary or vacuum secondary, which style of carburetor should I use and why?

A. Generally speaking, a mechanical secondary carburetor is preferred on vehicles with manual transmissions and on automatic transmissions with 3000+ RPM stall-speed converters. For automatics with less than 3000-RPM stall-speed converters, the vacuum-secondary carburetor is usually the better choice.

4) Q. How do I set the float levels and what effect do they have?

A. On Demon carburetors in street-driven applications, begin by setting the float levels at _ distance of the sight window. On race applications, increase the levels by setting them between _ and _ distance in the sight window. On Holley carburetors, remove the level plug and adjust the float level until fuel trickles from the open port. Changing the float levels alters the amount of fuel in the bowl (reservoir) and the carburetor's ability to feed the main jets. By raising the float level the engine's response is quickened. This is an adjustment frequently used to eradicate a lean stumble. By lowering the float levels, the activation of the main metering circuit is delayed and consequently produces a leaner mixture coming off idle. For street applications the latter condition is more economical.

5) Q. Does a bigger carb make more power? What's the limit?

A. A larger carburetor can produce more power on a dynamometer, but under normal operating conditions can result in slower acceleration and lower efficiency of fuel atomization. Select the smaller carburetor, especially if you're undecided about sizes. The smaller diameter venturii increase the velocity of the air/fuel mixture. As a consequence, it usually provides better acceleration and proves to be more efficient.

6) Q. Where should the fuel-pressure regulator be located and what type should I use?

A. The pressure regulator should be mounted close to the object (carburetor, nitrous system, etc.) that's being fed with fuel. The further away the regulator is placed the greater the delay in its response (its opening and closing). A slower response causes fluctuations (spikes) in the fuel pressure. Regarding the selection of a regulator, specific vehicle requirements, but especially the type of fuel pump already in use dictates the type of fuel-pressure regulator required. For example, combine a block-mounted 15-psi pump with a throttle bypass; a belt-driven pump with a diaphragm bypass; a BG280 electric pump with a two-port regulator and a BG400 with a four-port regulator.

7) Q. How does weather and altitude affect carb jetting?

A. The more oxygen there is in the air the more fuel the engine will demand. For example, as the weather becomes colder (winter) or the altitude lower (closer to sea level), the air will contain more oxygen and the engine will require a larger jet size. In contrast, as the weather becomes warmer (summer) or the altitude higher (mountainous) the jet size needs to be reduced.

Used with permission:
Barry Grant, Inc.
and
www.racingarticles.com
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Decking -
The 'deck' (face where the head bolts against) gets machined down, reducing the 'deck height'. Ups the compression without altering the head (so if you want a head that is not dedicated to high compression motors but the block is expendable), but obviously it doesn't work if your pistons are gonna hang out the top

Is also used to alter the piston top dead centre to deck height.
Example, if you stroke a motor and the new pistons are too far down the bores at top dead centre.


It also removes the engine number from 253 and 308 blocks!!!!!

#2 rodomo

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Posted 12 October 2008 - 04:31 PM

What's an enderwigginau? :huh: - The arm of the forum that bans people without rhyme or reason :D

#3 enderwigginau

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 12:29 PM

I will begin to remove posts and replies as the answers are included in the original post.

#4 82911

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Posted 15 October 2008 - 01:36 PM

So its like a sway bar attached to the body of the car?


NO, not at all....
A sway bars function is to resist compression of the outside suspension under cornering loads. It does this by linking to the suspension on the inside of the car. As the outside compresses under cornering load the bar transfers weight to the inside suspension to resist the load... ultimately limiting the roll angle.

A Panhard bar serves the same function as a watts link, but is an inferior design. It limits lateral movement of the diff housing within the wheel housings. So it stops the diff moving sideways like a pendulum under the car.
The reason a Torana doesn't need a panhard and a Commodore does is that the Torana's upper arms are set an an agle and the Commodores are parallel with the centreline of the vehicle.

#5 enderwigginau

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 01:36 PM

Greg - a definition of Watts Link would be good now - just don't mention anything else you'll nedd to explain!! :P

Grant..

#6 ls2lxhatch

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Posted 17 October 2008 - 10:23 PM

I think you could add to the following to the description of that panhard bar or maybe just this link.
http://www.afcoracin...s/panhard.shtml

The diff will move a controlled amount from side to side due to the arc created by the panhard bar. The panhard bar result in different handling characteristics for left and right turns.

#7 enderwigginau

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Posted 18 October 2008 - 10:09 AM

You make the bar as long as is physically possible to counteract this as much as possible.

Grant..

#8 enderwigginau

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Posted 20 October 2008 - 03:24 PM

keep em coming

#9 Heath

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Posted 20 October 2008 - 05:40 PM

A while ago, rodomo asked me what a 'M.I.L.F.' was, maybe it's worth putting that up here too?

#10 _ChiaLX_

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Posted 21 October 2008 - 08:35 AM

in reference to carbies what is annular discharge? is it a different setup to boosters?

Edit - I'll put some carby info in here VERY soon - Grant..

#11 enderwigginau

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 12:39 PM



Test

#12 Bomber Watson

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Posted 22 October 2008 - 07:23 PM

A while ago, rodomo asked me what a 'M.I.L.F.' was, maybe it's worth putting that up here too?



I got in trouble for elaborating on something like that, perhaps it shouldn't go up :P

#13 enderwigginau

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 12:44 PM

Best we stick to auto related topics kiddies. :P

Grant..

#14 ToRunYa

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 01:12 PM

^hehe, remember that... didnt end well.

#15 _ronaldoredsox_

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Posted 23 October 2008 - 01:13 PM

Oh! My next question was going to be 'WHAT IS SEX?'. I haven't had any for a while and I forget!!!!!!

#16 enderwigginau

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 12:13 PM

I'm sure Bomber will email you a link to ..... something........

And you can get a pop-up book!

Any more legit questions/definitions? And you can use the A fella a spoke to didn't know what a "Xxxxxxx" was. We won't judge you.
Well, I won't. :D

Grant..

#17 _ChiaLX_

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 03:37 PM

that cleared it up. thanks Grant

#18 enderwigginau

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Posted 24 October 2008 - 10:51 PM

C'mon all, lets use this for good.

Grant..

#19 enderwigginau

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 12:39 PM

Bump......

#20 _ChiaLX_

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 10:17 PM

ok a new one.
I have nice set of heads that flow 310cfm for a chev stroker I will be getting built in the future. can someone explain how people talk about some heads flow 5 or 6 hundred horsepower.
how do they work out the horsepower a head will flow. I understand cfm .

#21 MRLXSS

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 10:16 AM

Got another one.

On my engines (that bought 2nd hand) spec receipt. It says it has a Bonded Harmonic Balancer.

What does this mean, and what does it help/improve?

Cheers experts!

Matt

#22 TerrA LX

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 10:47 AM

ok a new one.
I have nice set of heads that flow 310cfm for a chev stroker I will be getting built in the future. can someone explain how people talk about some heads flow 5 or 6 hundred horsepower.
how do they work out the horsepower a head will flow. I understand cfm .


Horsepower = CFM x 1.63.

#23 _Courage_

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 12:49 PM

Tell me all aboutt Compression, also cna you advise why all the low compression engines where sent oversea's (presume NZ and PNG)

#24 76lxhatch

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 01:14 PM

also cna you advise why all the low compression engines where sent oversea's (presume NZ and PNG)

We are the only silly buggers that will accept the underpowered versions, it's all about balancing costs with what sells. We got the 2L VL Commodores as well

#25 _The Baron_

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Posted 07 November 2008 - 04:24 PM

Sh!t fuel survival I would say, is why they exported low compression engines.




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